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The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

A cool tool for monetizing your Facebook group(Disclaimer: This article contains affiliate links, which means I get a commission if you make a purchase by following one my links)

Do you have a Facebook group? If so, how do you convert your Facebook Members to email subscribers and sales leads?

We’ve been testing a pretty cool tool that does exactly this, allowing you to create Facebook group funnels in minutes.

Having a Facebook group can be great for building a community around your blog. But if your group members aren’t already subscribers, how do you convince them to sign up? And how do you monetize this audience without posting sales posts in the group or pitching them via DMs?

Most importantly, how would you keep communicating with your Facebook group members if Facebook shut down your group tomorrow? (Yes, it can and does happen.)

Our ProBlogger Community Facebook group has more than 20,000 members, while our Digital Photography School Facebook group has more than 100,000 members. And both have paid community managers looking after them. So we’re keen to see whether our investment in this social media channel can show a return we can measure alongside the intangible benefits of awareness and community building.

Email marketing and customer relationship management (CRM) tools with Facebook group functionality do exist, but these are often quite expensive. You can also build your own automations, integrations and workarounds with tools like Zapier. But we wanted something that was simple, easy to use and affordable.

Fortunately, we found a tool called Group Leads that ticks all those boxes.

Our new tool

Group Leads is a chrome extension (you just install it in your web browser) that allows you to:

  • manage your Facebook group membership application and approval process
  • capture email addresses
  • trigger an email autoresponder.

It’s a relatively new solution, launching about a year ago along with number of similar solutions built around developments in Facebook’s group question features. This allows you to use new membership question types to ask smarter questions from your group members.

As with all new software, it’s had a few teething problems. And because it integrates with Facebook, issues often need to be ironed out when Facebook makes any big changes.

But despite these minor frustrations, we’re finding it’s well worth the monthly subscription, which is quite affordable. It saves us time in group administration, and generates revenue from new customers.

I won’t go into all of its features. (You can read all about those on their website.) What I will go into is how we’re using it.

Basic setup

One of the best things about Group Leads is how easy it is to set up. There’s nothing too technical, and their help documentation and support are both good.

Here’s all you need to do to get it up and running.

  1. Install Group Leads chrome extension to your browser.
  2. Click a button to add your Facebook group to your Group Leads account.
  3. Modify your Facebook group membership questions to ask for an email address.
  4. Create a Google Sheet to house your Facebook group contacts.
  5. Integrate your autoresponder (email service). Group Leads can integrate with 33 different autoresponders, including popular services such as AWeber, Active Campaign, Convertkit, Drip and Mailchimp.

And that’s it. You’re now ready to start generating email leads from your Facebook group.

Optional features

Group Leads includes a couple of optional features.

Auto-Approve

Mirroring Facebook’s own auto-approve option, Group Leads can admit members based on criteria related to them:

  • answering your application questions
  • supplying their email address
  • agreeing to group rules.

Both of our Facebook groups are quite large (we receive hundreds of applications for Digital Photography School each week), and so we switched Auto-approve on.

Welcome Messaging

You can also send automated Facebook messages (DMs) to new and declined members, and tag new members in welcome posts.

We’re not doing this because we’ve heard reports of Facebook cracking down on DMs.

What we do

But why would people joining a Facebook group give you their email address?

We generate email leads via Facebook the same way we do on our blog – by offering an incentive (lead magnet) in return for subscribers opting in.

So for ProBlogger we ask:

“As well as access to the ProBlogger Community Facebook Group, would you like access to any of the following resources to help you grow your blog?”

We then deliver these resources via the ProBlogger PLUS Member Library.

And for Digital Photography School we ask:

“Would you like to access our Library of downloadable Ultimate Photography Guides? Access is via our free membership, which includes a weekly newsletter.”

In each case, access to the resources is granted via an automation triggered in our email system by creating a subscriber with the specific tag from Group Leads.

The automation also triggers a welcome sequence of emails to the new subscriber.

The results

We’ve been using Group Leads with our ProBlogger Facebook group since April, and have already added hundreds of new email subscribers. And of those, around 10% have gone on to purchase a product or enrol in one of our courses.

Over time we expect more of these new subscribers to buy something from us, and more sales to those who have already purchased (lifetime value). In the meantime, we’re adding new subscribers from our Facebook Group every day.

Based on this success, we added our Digital Photography School Facebook group to Group Leads in May. (The Group Leads Starter Account lets you have two Facebook groups on the same account, which suits us perfectly.) And while sales results are harder to track in this case, we’ve already added a couple of hundred new email subscribers through this channel.

Tips

  • Get Group Leads. If you have a free Facebook group (i.e. the members didn’t buy anything from you to gain entry) there’s little risk and a big upside to implementing a lead generation tool such as Group Leads.
  • Start with a clear objective and pathway for your new subscribers. Make sure you have something tangible to offer as a lead magnet. It’s even better if it progresses your subscribers closer to a sale.
  • Set up your systems to track and measure your results. Think about how you’ll track your Group Leads tagged subscribers through to making a sale.
  • Test, test, and test again. Before you flick the switch to go live with your new Facebook group lead generation system, make sure you’ve tested it and ironed out any kinks in the user experience and that all your tag-based automations trigger like they’re supposed to do.
  • Keep a close eye on it. (If you’re used to being fairly hands-on with admitting new members to your Facebook group, you’ll be used to this.) But as I said earlier, whenever Facebook makes a change it can create hiccups with the extension.

Over to you

Do you have a Facebook group? Think Group Leads could help you get more subscriptions? Let us know in the comments.

 

Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

     

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The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

A cool tool for monetizing your Facebook group(Disclaimer: This article contains affiliate links, which means I get a commission if you make a purchase by following one my links)

Do you have a Facebook group? If so, how do you convert your Facebook Members to email subscribers and sales leads?

We’ve been testing a pretty cool tool that does exactly this, allowing you to create Facebook group funnels in minutes.

Having a Facebook group can be great for building a community around your blog. But if your group members aren’t already subscribers, how do you convince them to sign up? And how do you monetize this audience without posting sales posts in the group or pitching them via DMs?

Most importantly, how would you keep communicating with your Facebook group members if Facebook shut down your group tomorrow? (Yes, it can and does happen.)

Our ProBlogger Community Facebook group has more than 20,000 members, while our Digital Photography School Facebook group has more than 100,000 members. And both have paid community managers looking after them. So we’re keen to see whether our investment in this social media channel can show a return we can measure alongside the intangible benefits of awareness and community building.

Email marketing and customer relationship management (CRM) tools with Facebook group functionality do exist, but these are often quite expensive. You can also build your own automations, integrations and workarounds with tools like Zapier. But we wanted something that was simple, easy to use and affordable.

Fortunately, we found a tool called Group Leads that ticks all those boxes.

Our new tool

Group Leads is a chrome extension (you just install it in your web browser) that allows you to:

  • manage your Facebook group membership application and approval process
  • capture email addresses
  • trigger an email autoresponder.

It’s a relatively new solution, launching about a year ago along with number of similar solutions built around developments in Facebook’s group question features. This allows you to use new membership question types to ask smarter questions from your group members.

As with all new software, it’s had a few teething problems. And because it integrates with Facebook, issues often need to be ironed out when Facebook makes any big changes.

But despite these minor frustrations, we’re finding it’s well worth the monthly subscription, which is quite affordable. It saves us time in group administration, and generates revenue from new customers.

I won’t go into all of its features. (You can read all about those on their website.) What I will go into is how we’re using it.

Basic setup

One of the best things about Group Leads is how easy it is to set up. There’s nothing too technical, and their help documentation and support are both good.

Here’s all you need to do to get it up and running.

  1. Install Group Leads chrome extension to your browser.
  2. Click a button to add your Facebook group to your Group Leads account.
  3. Modify your Facebook group membership questions to ask for an email address.
  4. Create a Google Sheet to house your Facebook group contacts.
  5. Integrate your autoresponder (email service). Group Leads can integrate with 33 different autoresponders, including popular services such as AWeber, Active Campaign, Convertkit, Drip and Mailchimp.

And that’s it. You’re now ready to start generating email leads from your Facebook group.

Optional features

Group Leads includes a couple of optional features.

Auto-Approve

Mirroring Facebook’s own auto-approve option, Group Leads can admit members based on criteria related to them:

  • answering your application questions
  • supplying their email address
  • agreeing to group rules.

Both of our Facebook groups are quite large (we receive hundreds of applications for Digital Photography School each week), and so we switched Auto-approve on.

Welcome Messaging

You can also send automated Facebook messages (DMs) to new and declined members, and tag new members in welcome posts.

We’re not doing this because we’ve heard reports of Facebook cracking down on DMs.

What we do

But why would people joining a Facebook group give you their email address?

We generate email leads via Facebook the same way we do on our blog – by offering an incentive (lead magnet) in return for subscribers opting in.

So for ProBlogger we ask:

“As well as access to the ProBlogger Community Facebook Group, would you like access to any of the following resources to help you grow your blog?”

We then deliver these resources via the ProBlogger PLUS Member Library.

And for Digital Photography School we ask:

“Would you like to access our Library of downloadable Ultimate Photography Guides? Access is via our free membership, which includes a weekly newsletter.”

In each case, access to the resources is granted via an automation triggered in our email system by creating a subscriber with the specific tag from Group Leads.

The automation also triggers a welcome sequence of emails to the new subscriber.

The results

We’ve been using Group Leads with our ProBlogger Facebook group since April, and have already added hundreds of new email subscribers. And of those, around 10% have gone on to purchase a product or enrol in one of our courses.

Over time we expect more of these new subscribers to buy something from us, and more sales to those who have already purchased (lifetime value). In the meantime, we’re adding new subscribers from our Facebook Group every day.

Based on this success, we added our Digital Photography School Facebook group to Group Leads in May. (The Group Leads Starter Account lets you have two Facebook groups on the same account, which suits us perfectly.) And while sales results are harder to track in this case, we’ve already added a couple of hundred new email subscribers through this channel.

Tips

  • Get Group Leads. If you have a free Facebook group (i.e. the members didn’t buy anything from you to gain entry) there’s little risk and a big upside to implementing a lead generation tool such as Group Leads.
  • Start with a clear objective and pathway for your new subscribers. Make sure you have something tangible to offer as a lead magnet. It’s even better if it progresses your subscribers closer to a sale.
  • Set up your systems to track and measure your results. Think about how you’ll track your Group Leads tagged subscribers through to making a sale.
  • Test, test, and test again. Before you flick the switch to go live with your new Facebook group lead generation system, make sure you’ve tested it and ironed out any kinks in the user experience and that all your tag-based automations trigger like they’re supposed to do.
  • Keep a close eye on it. (If you’re used to being fairly hands-on with admitting new members to your Facebook group, you’ll be used to this.) But as I said earlier, whenever Facebook makes a change it can create hiccups with the extension.

Over to you

Do you have a Facebook group? Think Group Leads could help you get more subscriptions? Let us know in the comments.

 

Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

     

Absolutely love anything about online

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

A cool tool for monetizing your Facebook group(Disclaimer: This article contains affiliate links, which means I get a commission if you make a purchase by following one my links)

Do you have a Facebook group? If so, how do you convert your Facebook Members to email subscribers and sales leads?

We’ve been testing a pretty cool tool that does exactly this, allowing you to create Facebook group funnels in minutes.

Having a Facebook group can be great for building a community around your blog. But if your group members aren’t already subscribers, how do you convince them to sign up? And how do you monetize this audience without posting sales posts in the group or pitching them via DMs?

Most importantly, how would you keep communicating with your Facebook group members if Facebook shut down your group tomorrow? (Yes, it can and does happen.)

Our ProBlogger Community Facebook group has more than 20,000 members, while our Digital Photography School Facebook group has more than 100,000 members. And both have paid community managers looking after them. So we’re keen to see whether our investment in this social media channel can show a return we can measure alongside the intangible benefits of awareness and community building.

Email marketing and customer relationship management (CRM) tools with Facebook group functionality do exist, but these are often quite expensive. You can also build your own automations, integrations and workarounds with tools like Zapier. But we wanted something that was simple, easy to use and affordable.

Fortunately, we found a tool called Group Leads that ticks all those boxes.

Our new tool

Group Leads is a chrome extension (you just install it in your web browser) that allows you to:

  • manage your Facebook group membership application and approval process
  • capture email addresses
  • trigger an email autoresponder.

It’s a relatively new solution, launching about a year ago along with number of similar solutions built around developments in Facebook’s group question features. This allows you to use new membership question types to ask smarter questions from your group members.

As with all new software, it’s had a few teething problems. And because it integrates with Facebook, issues often need to be ironed out when Facebook makes any big changes.

But despite these minor frustrations, we’re finding it’s well worth the monthly subscription, which is quite affordable. It saves us time in group administration, and generates revenue from new customers.

I won’t go into all of its features. (You can read all about those on their website.) What I will go into is how we’re using it.

Basic setup

One of the best things about Group Leads is how easy it is to set up. There’s nothing too technical, and their help documentation and support are both good.

Here’s all you need to do to get it up and running.

  1. Install Group Leads chrome extension to your browser.
  2. Click a button to add your Facebook group to your Group Leads account.
  3. Modify your Facebook group membership questions to ask for an email address.
  4. Create a Google Sheet to house your Facebook group contacts.
  5. Integrate your autoresponder (email service). Group Leads can integrate with 33 different autoresponders, including popular services such as AWeber, Active Campaign, Convertkit, Drip and Mailchimp.

And that’s it. You’re now ready to start generating email leads from your Facebook group.

Optional features

Group Leads includes a couple of optional features.

Auto-Approve

Mirroring Facebook’s own auto-approve option, Group Leads can admit members based on criteria related to them:

  • answering your application questions
  • supplying their email address
  • agreeing to group rules.

Both of our Facebook groups are quite large (we receive hundreds of applications for Digital Photography School each week), and so we switched Auto-approve on.

Welcome Messaging

You can also send automated Facebook messages (DMs) to new and declined members, and tag new members in welcome posts.

We’re not doing this because we’ve heard reports of Facebook cracking down on DMs.

What we do

But why would people joining a Facebook group give you their email address?

We generate email leads via Facebook the same way we do on our blog – by offering an incentive (lead magnet) in return for subscribers opting in.

So for ProBlogger we ask:

“As well as access to the ProBlogger Community Facebook Group, would you like access to any of the following resources to help you grow your blog?”

We then deliver these resources via the ProBlogger PLUS Member Library.

And for Digital Photography School we ask:

“Would you like to access our Library of downloadable Ultimate Photography Guides? Access is via our free membership, which includes a weekly newsletter.”

In each case, access to the resources is granted via an automation triggered in our email system by creating a subscriber with the specific tag from Group Leads.

The automation also triggers a welcome sequence of emails to the new subscriber.

The results

We’ve been using Group Leads with our ProBlogger Facebook group since April, and have already added hundreds of new email subscribers. And of those, around 10% have gone on to purchase a product or enrol in one of our courses.

Over time we expect more of these new subscribers to buy something from us, and more sales to those who have already purchased (lifetime value). In the meantime, we’re adding new subscribers from our Facebook Group every day.

Based on this success, we added our Digital Photography School Facebook group to Group Leads in May. (The Group Leads Starter Account lets you have two Facebook groups on the same account, which suits us perfectly.) And while sales results are harder to track in this case, we’ve already added a couple of hundred new email subscribers through this channel.

Tips

  • Get Group Leads. If you have a free Facebook group (i.e. the members didn’t buy anything from you to gain entry) there’s little risk and a big upside to implementing a lead generation tool such as Group Leads.
  • Start with a clear objective and pathway for your new subscribers. Make sure you have something tangible to offer as a lead magnet. It’s even better if it progresses your subscribers closer to a sale.
  • Set up your systems to track and measure your results. Think about how you’ll track your Group Leads tagged subscribers through to making a sale.
  • Test, test, and test again. Before you flick the switch to go live with your new Facebook group lead generation system, make sure you’ve tested it and ironed out any kinks in the user experience and that all your tag-based automations trigger like they’re supposed to do.
  • Keep a close eye on it. (If you’re used to being fairly hands-on with admitting new members to your Facebook group, you’ll be used to this.) But as I said earlier, whenever Facebook makes a change it can create hiccups with the extension.

Over to you

Do you have a Facebook group? Think Group Leads could help you get more subscriptions? Let us know in the comments.

 

Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

     

Who else? <3online

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

A cool tool for monetizing your Facebook group(Disclaimer: This article contains affiliate links, which means I get a commission if you make a purchase by following one my links)

Do you have a Facebook group? If so, how do you convert your Facebook Members to email subscribers and sales leads?

We’ve been testing a pretty cool tool that does exactly this, allowing you to create Facebook group funnels in minutes.

Having a Facebook group can be great for building a community around your blog. But if your group members aren’t already subscribers, how do you convince them to sign up? And how do you monetize this audience without posting sales posts in the group or pitching them via DMs?

Most importantly, how would you keep communicating with your Facebook group members if Facebook shut down your group tomorrow? (Yes, it can and does happen.)

Our ProBlogger Community Facebook group has more than 20,000 members, while our Digital Photography School Facebook group has more than 100,000 members. And both have paid community managers looking after them. So we’re keen to see whether our investment in this social media channel can show a return we can measure alongside the intangible benefits of awareness and community building.

Email marketing and customer relationship management (CRM) tools with Facebook group functionality do exist, but these are often quite expensive. You can also build your own automations, integrations and workarounds with tools like Zapier. But we wanted something that was simple, easy to use and affordable.

Fortunately, we found a tool called Group Leads that ticks all those boxes.

Our new tool

Group Leads is a chrome extension (you just install it in your web browser) that allows you to:

  • manage your Facebook group membership application and approval process
  • capture email addresses
  • trigger an email autoresponder.

It’s a relatively new solution, launching about a year ago along with number of similar solutions built around developments in Facebook’s group question features. This allows you to use new membership question types to ask smarter questions from your group members.

As with all new software, it’s had a few teething problems. And because it integrates with Facebook, issues often need to be ironed out when Facebook makes any big changes.

But despite these minor frustrations, we’re finding it’s well worth the monthly subscription, which is quite affordable. It saves us time in group administration, and generates revenue from new customers.

I won’t go into all of its features. (You can read all about those on their website.) What I will go into is how we’re using it.

Basic setup

One of the best things about Group Leads is how easy it is to set up. There’s nothing too technical, and their help documentation and support are both good.

Here’s all you need to do to get it up and running.

  1. Install Group Leads chrome extension to your browser.
  2. Click a button to add your Facebook group to your Group Leads account.
  3. Modify your Facebook group membership questions to ask for an email address.
  4. Create a Google Sheet to house your Facebook group contacts.
  5. Integrate your autoresponder (email service). Group Leads can integrate with 33 different autoresponders, including popular services such as AWeber, Active Campaign, Convertkit, Drip and Mailchimp.

And that’s it. You’re now ready to start generating email leads from your Facebook group.

Optional features

Group Leads includes a couple of optional features.

Auto-Approve

Mirroring Facebook’s own auto-approve option, Group Leads can admit members based on criteria related to them:

  • answering your application questions
  • supplying their email address
  • agreeing to group rules.

Both of our Facebook groups are quite large (we receive hundreds of applications for Digital Photography School each week), and so we switched Auto-approve on.

Welcome Messaging

You can also send automated Facebook messages (DMs) to new and declined members, and tag new members in welcome posts.

We’re not doing this because we’ve heard reports of Facebook cracking down on DMs.

What we do

But why would people joining a Facebook group give you their email address?

We generate email leads via Facebook the same way we do on our blog – by offering an incentive (lead magnet) in return for subscribers opting in.

So for ProBlogger we ask:

“As well as access to the ProBlogger Community Facebook Group, would you like access to any of the following resources to help you grow your blog?”

We then deliver these resources via the ProBlogger PLUS Member Library.

And for Digital Photography School we ask:

“Would you like to access our Library of downloadable Ultimate Photography Guides? Access is via our free membership, which includes a weekly newsletter.”

In each case, access to the resources is granted via an automation triggered in our email system by creating a subscriber with the specific tag from Group Leads.

The automation also triggers a welcome sequence of emails to the new subscriber.

The results

We’ve been using Group Leads with our ProBlogger Facebook group since April, and have already added hundreds of new email subscribers. And of those, around 10% have gone on to purchase a product or enrol in one of our courses.

Over time we expect more of these new subscribers to buy something from us, and more sales to those who have already purchased (lifetime value). In the meantime, we’re adding new subscribers from our Facebook Group every day.

Based on this success, we added our Digital Photography School Facebook group to Group Leads in May. (The Group Leads Starter Account lets you have two Facebook groups on the same account, which suits us perfectly.) And while sales results are harder to track in this case, we’ve already added a couple of hundred new email subscribers through this channel.

Tips

  • Get Group Leads. If you have a free Facebook group (i.e. the members didn’t buy anything from you to gain entry) there’s little risk and a big upside to implementing a lead generation tool such as Group Leads.
  • Start with a clear objective and pathway for your new subscribers. Make sure you have something tangible to offer as a lead magnet. It’s even better if it progresses your subscribers closer to a sale.
  • Set up your systems to track and measure your results. Think about how you’ll track your Group Leads tagged subscribers through to making a sale.
  • Test, test, and test again. Before you flick the switch to go live with your new Facebook group lead generation system, make sure you’ve tested it and ironed out any kinks in the user experience and that all your tag-based automations trigger like they’re supposed to do.
  • Keep a close eye on it. (If you’re used to being fairly hands-on with admitting new members to your Facebook group, you’ll be used to this.) But as I said earlier, whenever Facebook makes a change it can create hiccups with the extension.

Over to you

Do you have a Facebook group? Think Group Leads could help you get more subscriptions? Let us know in the comments.

 

Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

     

Interesting really great more on online please

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

A cool tool for monetizing your Facebook group(Disclaimer: This article contains affiliate links, which means I get a commission if you make a purchase by following one my links)

Do you have a Facebook group? If so, how do you convert your Facebook Members to email subscribers and sales leads?

We’ve been testing a pretty cool tool that does exactly this, allowing you to create Facebook group funnels in minutes.

Having a Facebook group can be great for building a community around your blog. But if your group members aren’t already subscribers, how do you convince them to sign up? And how do you monetize this audience without posting sales posts in the group or pitching them via DMs?

Most importantly, how would you keep communicating with your Facebook group members if Facebook shut down your group tomorrow? (Yes, it can and does happen.)

Our ProBlogger Community Facebook group has more than 20,000 members, while our Digital Photography School Facebook group has more than 100,000 members. And both have paid community managers looking after them. So we’re keen to see whether our investment in this social media channel can show a return we can measure alongside the intangible benefits of awareness and community building.

Email marketing and customer relationship management (CRM) tools with Facebook group functionality do exist, but these are often quite expensive. You can also build your own automations, integrations and workarounds with tools like Zapier. But we wanted something that was simple, easy to use and affordable.

Fortunately, we found a tool called Group Leads that ticks all those boxes.

Our new tool

Group Leads is a chrome extension (you just install it in your web browser) that allows you to:

  • manage your Facebook group membership application and approval process
  • capture email addresses
  • trigger an email autoresponder.

It’s a relatively new solution, launching about a year ago along with number of similar solutions built around developments in Facebook’s group question features. This allows you to use new membership question types to ask smarter questions from your group members.

As with all new software, it’s had a few teething problems. And because it integrates with Facebook, issues often need to be ironed out when Facebook makes any big changes.

But despite these minor frustrations, we’re finding it’s well worth the monthly subscription, which is quite affordable. It saves us time in group administration, and generates revenue from new customers.

I won’t go into all of its features. (You can read all about those on their website.) What I will go into is how we’re using it.

Basic setup

One of the best things about Group Leads is how easy it is to set up. There’s nothing too technical, and their help documentation and support are both good.

Here’s all you need to do to get it up and running.

  1. Install Group Leads chrome extension to your browser.
  2. Click a button to add your Facebook group to your Group Leads account.
  3. Modify your Facebook group membership questions to ask for an email address.
  4. Create a Google Sheet to house your Facebook group contacts.
  5. Integrate your autoresponder (email service). Group Leads can integrate with 33 different autoresponders, including popular services such as AWeber, Active Campaign, Convertkit, Drip and Mailchimp.

And that’s it. You’re now ready to start generating email leads from your Facebook group.

Optional features

Group Leads includes a couple of optional features.

Auto-Approve

Mirroring Facebook’s own auto-approve option, Group Leads can admit members based on criteria related to them:

  • answering your application questions
  • supplying their email address
  • agreeing to group rules.

Both of our Facebook groups are quite large (we receive hundreds of applications for Digital Photography School each week), and so we switched Auto-approve on.

Welcome Messaging

You can also send automated Facebook messages (DMs) to new and declined members, and tag new members in welcome posts.

We’re not doing this because we’ve heard reports of Facebook cracking down on DMs.

What we do

But why would people joining a Facebook group give you their email address?

We generate email leads via Facebook the same way we do on our blog – by offering an incentive (lead magnet) in return for subscribers opting in.

So for ProBlogger we ask:

“As well as access to the ProBlogger Community Facebook Group, would you like access to any of the following resources to help you grow your blog?”

We then deliver these resources via the ProBlogger PLUS Member Library.

And for Digital Photography School we ask:

“Would you like to access our Library of downloadable Ultimate Photography Guides? Access is via our free membership, which includes a weekly newsletter.”

In each case, access to the resources is granted via an automation triggered in our email system by creating a subscriber with the specific tag from Group Leads.

The automation also triggers a welcome sequence of emails to the new subscriber.

The results

We’ve been using Group Leads with our ProBlogger Facebook group since April, and have already added hundreds of new email subscribers. And of those, around 10% have gone on to purchase a product or enrol in one of our courses.

Over time we expect more of these new subscribers to buy something from us, and more sales to those who have already purchased (lifetime value). In the meantime, we’re adding new subscribers from our Facebook Group every day.

Based on this success, we added our Digital Photography School Facebook group to Group Leads in May. (The Group Leads Starter Account lets you have two Facebook groups on the same account, which suits us perfectly.) And while sales results are harder to track in this case, we’ve already added a couple of hundred new email subscribers through this channel.

Tips

  • Get Group Leads. If you have a free Facebook group (i.e. the members didn’t buy anything from you to gain entry) there’s little risk and a big upside to implementing a lead generation tool such as Group Leads.
  • Start with a clear objective and pathway for your new subscribers. Make sure you have something tangible to offer as a lead magnet. It’s even better if it progresses your subscribers closer to a sale.
  • Set up your systems to track and measure your results. Think about how you’ll track your Group Leads tagged subscribers through to making a sale.
  • Test, test, and test again. Before you flick the switch to go live with your new Facebook group lead generation system, make sure you’ve tested it and ironed out any kinks in the user experience and that all your tag-based automations trigger like they’re supposed to do.
  • Keep a close eye on it. (If you’re used to being fairly hands-on with admitting new members to your Facebook group, you’ll be used to this.) But as I said earlier, whenever Facebook makes a change it can create hiccups with the extension.

Over to you

Do you have a Facebook group? Think Group Leads could help you get more subscriptions? Let us know in the comments.

 

Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

     

Thanks big making fan here

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

A cool tool for monetizing your Facebook group(Disclaimer: This article contains affiliate links, which means I get a commission if you make a purchase by following one my links)

Do you have a Facebook group? If so, how do you convert your Facebook Members to email subscribers and sales leads?

We’ve been testing a pretty cool tool that does exactly this, allowing you to create Facebook group funnels in minutes.

Having a Facebook group can be great for building a community around your blog. But if your group members aren’t already subscribers, how do you convince them to sign up? And how do you monetize this audience without posting sales posts in the group or pitching them via DMs?

Most importantly, how would you keep communicating with your Facebook group members if Facebook shut down your group tomorrow? (Yes, it can and does happen.)

Our ProBlogger Community Facebook group has more than 20,000 members, while our Digital Photography School Facebook group has more than 100,000 members. And both have paid community managers looking after them. So we’re keen to see whether our investment in this social media channel can show a return we can measure alongside the intangible benefits of awareness and community building.

Email marketing and customer relationship management (CRM) tools with Facebook group functionality do exist, but these are often quite expensive. You can also build your own automations, integrations and workarounds with tools like Zapier. But we wanted something that was simple, easy to use and affordable.

Fortunately, we found a tool called Group Leads that ticks all those boxes.

Our new tool

Group Leads is a chrome extension (you just install it in your web browser) that allows you to:

  • manage your Facebook group membership application and approval process
  • capture email addresses
  • trigger an email autoresponder.

It’s a relatively new solution, launching about a year ago along with number of similar solutions built around developments in Facebook’s group question features. This allows you to use new membership question types to ask smarter questions from your group members.

As with all new software, it’s had a few teething problems. And because it integrates with Facebook, issues often need to be ironed out when Facebook makes any big changes.

But despite these minor frustrations, we’re finding it’s well worth the monthly subscription, which is quite affordable. It saves us time in group administration, and generates revenue from new customers.

I won’t go into all of its features. (You can read all about those on their website.) What I will go into is how we’re using it.

Basic setup

One of the best things about Group Leads is how easy it is to set up. There’s nothing too technical, and their help documentation and support are both good.

Here’s all you need to do to get it up and running.

  1. Install Group Leads chrome extension to your browser.
  2. Click a button to add your Facebook group to your Group Leads account.
  3. Modify your Facebook group membership questions to ask for an email address.
  4. Create a Google Sheet to house your Facebook group contacts.
  5. Integrate your autoresponder (email service). Group Leads can integrate with 33 different autoresponders, including popular services such as AWeber, Active Campaign, Convertkit, Drip and Mailchimp.

And that’s it. You’re now ready to start generating email leads from your Facebook group.

Optional features

Group Leads includes a couple of optional features.

Auto-Approve

Mirroring Facebook’s own auto-approve option, Group Leads can admit members based on criteria related to them:

  • answering your application questions
  • supplying their email address
  • agreeing to group rules.

Both of our Facebook groups are quite large (we receive hundreds of applications for Digital Photography School each week), and so we switched Auto-approve on.

Welcome Messaging

You can also send automated Facebook messages (DMs) to new and declined members, and tag new members in welcome posts.

We’re not doing this because we’ve heard reports of Facebook cracking down on DMs.

What we do

But why would people joining a Facebook group give you their email address?

We generate email leads via Facebook the same way we do on our blog – by offering an incentive (lead magnet) in return for subscribers opting in.

So for ProBlogger we ask:

“As well as access to the ProBlogger Community Facebook Group, would you like access to any of the following resources to help you grow your blog?”

We then deliver these resources via the ProBlogger PLUS Member Library.

And for Digital Photography School we ask:

“Would you like to access our Library of downloadable Ultimate Photography Guides? Access is via our free membership, which includes a weekly newsletter.”

In each case, access to the resources is granted via an automation triggered in our email system by creating a subscriber with the specific tag from Group Leads.

The automation also triggers a welcome sequence of emails to the new subscriber.

The results

We’ve been using Group Leads with our ProBlogger Facebook group since April, and have already added hundreds of new email subscribers. And of those, around 10% have gone on to purchase a product or enrol in one of our courses.

Over time we expect more of these new subscribers to buy something from us, and more sales to those who have already purchased (lifetime value). In the meantime, we’re adding new subscribers from our Facebook Group every day.

Based on this success, we added our Digital Photography School Facebook group to Group Leads in May. (The Group Leads Starter Account lets you have two Facebook groups on the same account, which suits us perfectly.) And while sales results are harder to track in this case, we’ve already added a couple of hundred new email subscribers through this channel.

Tips

  • Get Group Leads. If you have a free Facebook group (i.e. the members didn’t buy anything from you to gain entry) there’s little risk and a big upside to implementing a lead generation tool such as Group Leads.
  • Start with a clear objective and pathway for your new subscribers. Make sure you have something tangible to offer as a lead magnet. It’s even better if it progresses your subscribers closer to a sale.
  • Set up your systems to track and measure your results. Think about how you’ll track your Group Leads tagged subscribers through to making a sale.
  • Test, test, and test again. Before you flick the switch to go live with your new Facebook group lead generation system, make sure you’ve tested it and ironed out any kinks in the user experience and that all your tag-based automations trigger like they’re supposed to do.
  • Keep a close eye on it. (If you’re used to being fairly hands-on with admitting new members to your Facebook group, you’ll be used to this.) But as I said earlier, whenever Facebook makes a change it can create hiccups with the extension.

Over to you

Do you have a Facebook group? Think Group Leads could help you get more subscriptions? Let us know in the comments.

 

Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

     

I am adding this website to my favorites! I will be back for more info~ Thanks!

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

A cool tool for monetizing your Facebook group(Disclaimer: This article contains affiliate links, which means I get a commission if you make a purchase by following one my links)

Do you have a Facebook group? If so, how do you convert your Facebook Members to email subscribers and sales leads?

We’ve been testing a pretty cool tool that does exactly this, allowing you to create Facebook group funnels in minutes.

Having a Facebook group can be great for building a community around your blog. But if your group members aren’t already subscribers, how do you convince them to sign up? And how do you monetize this audience without posting sales posts in the group or pitching them via DMs?

Most importantly, how would you keep communicating with your Facebook group members if Facebook shut down your group tomorrow? (Yes, it can and does happen.)

Our ProBlogger Community Facebook group has more than 20,000 members, while our Digital Photography School Facebook group has more than 100,000 members. And both have paid community managers looking after them. So we’re keen to see whether our investment in this social media channel can show a return we can measure alongside the intangible benefits of awareness and community building.

Email marketing and customer relationship management (CRM) tools with Facebook group functionality do exist, but these are often quite expensive. You can also build your own automations, integrations and workarounds with tools like Zapier. But we wanted something that was simple, easy to use and affordable.

Fortunately, we found a tool called Group Leads that ticks all those boxes.

Our new tool

Group Leads is a chrome extension (you just install it in your web browser) that allows you to:

  • manage your Facebook group membership application and approval process
  • capture email addresses
  • trigger an email autoresponder.

It’s a relatively new solution, launching about a year ago along with number of similar solutions built around developments in Facebook’s group question features. This allows you to use new membership question types to ask smarter questions from your group members.

As with all new software, it’s had a few teething problems. And because it integrates with Facebook, issues often need to be ironed out when Facebook makes any big changes.

But despite these minor frustrations, we’re finding it’s well worth the monthly subscription, which is quite affordable. It saves us time in group administration, and generates revenue from new customers.

I won’t go into all of its features. (You can read all about those on their website.) What I will go into is how we’re using it.

Basic setup

One of the best things about Group Leads is how easy it is to set up. There’s nothing too technical, and their help documentation and support are both good.

Here’s all you need to do to get it up and running.

  1. Install Group Leads chrome extension to your browser.
  2. Click a button to add your Facebook group to your Group Leads account.
  3. Modify your Facebook group membership questions to ask for an email address.
  4. Create a Google Sheet to house your Facebook group contacts.
  5. Integrate your autoresponder (email service). Group Leads can integrate with 33 different autoresponders, including popular services such as AWeber, Active Campaign, Convertkit, Drip and Mailchimp.

And that’s it. You’re now ready to start generating email leads from your Facebook group.

Optional features

Group Leads includes a couple of optional features.

Auto-Approve

Mirroring Facebook’s own auto-approve option, Group Leads can admit members based on criteria related to them:

  • answering your application questions
  • supplying their email address
  • agreeing to group rules.

Both of our Facebook groups are quite large (we receive hundreds of applications for Digital Photography School each week), and so we switched Auto-approve on.

Welcome Messaging

You can also send automated Facebook messages (DMs) to new and declined members, and tag new members in welcome posts.

We’re not doing this because we’ve heard reports of Facebook cracking down on DMs.

What we do

But why would people joining a Facebook group give you their email address?

We generate email leads via Facebook the same way we do on our blog – by offering an incentive (lead magnet) in return for subscribers opting in.

So for ProBlogger we ask:

“As well as access to the ProBlogger Community Facebook Group, would you like access to any of the following resources to help you grow your blog?”

We then deliver these resources via the ProBlogger PLUS Member Library.

And for Digital Photography School we ask:

“Would you like to access our Library of downloadable Ultimate Photography Guides? Access is via our free membership, which includes a weekly newsletter.”

In each case, access to the resources is granted via an automation triggered in our email system by creating a subscriber with the specific tag from Group Leads.

The automation also triggers a welcome sequence of emails to the new subscriber.

The results

We’ve been using Group Leads with our ProBlogger Facebook group since April, and have already added hundreds of new email subscribers. And of those, around 10% have gone on to purchase a product or enrol in one of our courses.

Over time we expect more of these new subscribers to buy something from us, and more sales to those who have already purchased (lifetime value). In the meantime, we’re adding new subscribers from our Facebook Group every day.

Based on this success, we added our Digital Photography School Facebook group to Group Leads in May. (The Group Leads Starter Account lets you have two Facebook groups on the same account, which suits us perfectly.) And while sales results are harder to track in this case, we’ve already added a couple of hundred new email subscribers through this channel.

Tips

  • Get Group Leads. If you have a free Facebook group (i.e. the members didn’t buy anything from you to gain entry) there’s little risk and a big upside to implementing a lead generation tool such as Group Leads.
  • Start with a clear objective and pathway for your new subscribers. Make sure you have something tangible to offer as a lead magnet. It’s even better if it progresses your subscribers closer to a sale.
  • Set up your systems to track and measure your results. Think about how you’ll track your Group Leads tagged subscribers through to making a sale.
  • Test, test, and test again. Before you flick the switch to go live with your new Facebook group lead generation system, make sure you’ve tested it and ironed out any kinks in the user experience and that all your tag-based automations trigger like they’re supposed to do.
  • Keep a close eye on it. (If you’re used to being fairly hands-on with admitting new members to your Facebook group, you’ll be used to this.) But as I said earlier, whenever Facebook makes a change it can create hiccups with the extension.

Over to you

Do you have a Facebook group? Think Group Leads could help you get more subscriptions? Let us know in the comments.

 

Photo by NeONBRAND on Unsplash

The post A Cool Tool for Monetizing Your Facebook Group appeared first on ProBlogger.

     

Anything about making is very important

The post 3 Things You Can Do to Protect the Content on Your Blog appeared first on ProBlogger.

3 things you can do to protect the content on your blogThis post is based on a guest post from Abhishek of Budding Geek.

One topic that comes up a lot at ProBlogger is plagiarism. More specifically, people want to know how they can protect their blog content from being copied and re-posted without their permission.

In our Facebook group people we often see questions like these:

  • “What software do you use to check for plagiarism?”
  • “What’s the best way to get a site taken down? Someone is scraping my blog and putting it all on their site – including my name.”
  • “I recently discovered that another site had copied one of my articles and republished it without my permission. Does anyone know of a tool for tracking down articles on other sites that are clearly plagiarized from my own?”

Having people copying your content and posting it as their own is bad enough. But when ‘their’ content starts outranking yours in search results, it just adds insult to injury.

Now, I’ve written a post that talks about what to do when someone steals your blog content. But as the saying goes, prevention is better than cure. So how can you stop people from grabbing your content in the first place?

How they get your content in the first place

Unfortunately, it’s practically impossible to stop someone from copying your content. If a browser can access it (which needs to happen if you want your content to appear on the web), then pretty much anyone can.

And that’s how a lot of people steal content from other people’s websites. They simply view the content in their browser, and then copy and paste it into whatever they’re using to publish ‘their’ content.

However, there’s another way people can steal your content, and that’s by subscribing to your RSS feed. With the right software, they can scan your posts and republish them in a matter of minutes. The software can even replace your main keywords with synonyms automatically.

As I said, you can’t really stop this thing from happening. But you can make the process of copying your content a lot harder, which may make it difficult enough for them not to bother.

How to protect your content

Here are a few ways you can give your content some protection from these plagiarists, and hopefully convince them to stop doing it.

1. Disable text selection on your blog

As I said earlier, a lot of people copy and paste content from other people’s blogs. And so stopping them from using copy and paste on your blog will make that process a lot more difficult.

If your blog is a WordPress site, you can use the WP Content Copy Protection plugin to stop them from using:

  • right-click
  • image drag/drop/save
  • text selection/drag/drop
  • source code viewing
  • keyboard copy shortcuts such as CTRL A, C, X, U, S and P).

2. Watermark your images

If you use images on your blog (and you probably should be to break up the text), then you need to protect them as well.

One of the simplest ways is to add a watermark to your images. Not only does it show you own the copyright for your images, it will also make people think twice about copying them (or even hotlinking to them) as they’ll have your blog’s name all over it.

While you can do this in most graphics packages, there are also online sites such as Watermarkly that will do it for you.

Important note: While you’re free to do this with images you’ve created yourself, check the licensing information before you do it with images you’ve downloaded from somewhere else. The last thing you want is to be guilty of stealing someone else’s content.

3. Manage your RSS feeds

Now let’s look at the second way these people can steal your content – through your RSS feeds.

One simple way to stop it (or at least make it a lot harder to do) is to only offer partial feeds. Yes, it means your readers will have to click a link to see the full post. But it also means the plagiarists will have to do the same, which may put them off.

Another option is to use a WordPress plugin such as Copyright Proof, which:

  • provides a digitally signed and time-stamped certificate of content of each post you publish (to prove you’re the creator and therefore own the copyright)
  • adds a combined certification, copyright, licensing, and attribution notice at end of each post.

As with watermarking your images, it won’t stop your content from being copied. But everyone will see that it’s been taken from your blog without your permission

Over to you?

As I said earlier, you’ll never be able to stop people from stealing your content completely. But hopefully these tips will make stealing yours much tougher, or at least not worth the effort.

Do you have any other tips for protecting your content? Feel free to share them in the comments.

 

Photo by Eric Krull on Unsplash

The post 3 Things You Can Do to Protect the Content on Your Blog appeared first on ProBlogger.

     

Anything related to this is really important

The post 3 Things You Can Do to Protect the Content on Your Blog appeared first on ProBlogger.

3 things you can do to protect the content on your blogThis post is based on a guest post from Abhishek of Budding Geek.

One topic that comes up a lot at ProBlogger is plagiarism. More specifically, people want to know how they can protect their blog content from being copied and re-posted without their permission.

In our Facebook group people we often see questions like these:

  • “What software do you use to check for plagiarism?”
  • “What’s the best way to get a site taken down? Someone is scraping my blog and putting it all on their site – including my name.”
  • “I recently discovered that another site had copied one of my articles and republished it without my permission. Does anyone know of a tool for tracking down articles on other sites that are clearly plagiarized from my own?”

Having people copying your content and posting it as their own is bad enough. But when ‘their’ content starts outranking yours in search results, it just adds insult to injury.

Now, I’ve written a post that talks about what to do when someone steals your blog content. But as the saying goes, prevention is better than cure. So how can you stop people from grabbing your content in the first place?

How they get your content in the first place

Unfortunately, it’s practically impossible to stop someone from copying your content. If a browser can access it (which needs to happen if you want your content to appear on the web), then pretty much anyone can.

And that’s how a lot of people steal content from other people’s websites. They simply view the content in their browser, and then copy and paste it into whatever they’re using to publish ‘their’ content.

However, there’s another way people can steal your content, and that’s by subscribing to your RSS feed. With the right software, they can scan your posts and republish them in a matter of minutes. The software can even replace your main keywords with synonyms automatically.

As I said, you can’t really stop this thing from happening. But you can make the process of copying your content a lot harder, which may make it difficult enough for them not to bother.

How to protect your content

Here are a few ways you can give your content some protection from these plagiarists, and hopefully convince them to stop doing it.

1. Disable text selection on your blog

As I said earlier, a lot of people copy and paste content from other people’s blogs. And so stopping them from using copy and paste on your blog will make that process a lot more difficult.

If your blog is a WordPress site, you can use the WP Content Copy Protection plugin to stop them from using:

  • right-click
  • image drag/drop/save
  • text selection/drag/drop
  • source code viewing
  • keyboard copy shortcuts such as CTRL A, C, X, U, S and P).

2. Watermark your images

If you use images on your blog (and you probably should be to break up the text), then you need to protect them as well.

One of the simplest ways is to add a watermark to your images. Not only does it show you own the copyright for your images, it will also make people think twice about copying them (or even hotlinking to them) as they’ll have your blog’s name all over it.

While you can do this in most graphics packages, there are also online sites such as Watermarkly that will do it for you.

Important note: While you’re free to do this with images you’ve created yourself, check the licensing information before you do it with images you’ve downloaded from somewhere else. The last thing you want is to be guilty of stealing someone else’s content.

3. Manage your RSS feeds

Now let’s look at the second way these people can steal your content – through your RSS feeds.

One simple way to stop it (or at least make it a lot harder to do) is to only offer partial feeds. Yes, it means your readers will have to click a link to see the full post. But it also means the plagiarists will have to do the same, which may put them off.

Another option is to use a WordPress plugin such as Copyright Proof, which:

  • provides a digitally signed and time-stamped certificate of content of each post you publish (to prove you’re the creator and therefore own the copyright)
  • adds a combined certification, copyright, licensing, and attribution notice at end of each post.

As with watermarking your images, it won’t stop your content from being copied. But everyone will see that it’s been taken from your blog without your permission

Over to you?

As I said earlier, you’ll never be able to stop people from stealing your content completely. But hopefully these tips will make stealing yours much tougher, or at least not worth the effort.

Do you have any other tips for protecting your content? Feel free to share them in the comments.

 

Photo by Eric Krull on Unsplash

The post 3 Things You Can Do to Protect the Content on Your Blog appeared first on ProBlogger.

     

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